512.666.9672 foundation@taahmf.com

Take a Closer Look at the Detail


 

Estevanico de Dorantes

The Black personal slave of Andres Dorantes de Carranza. Arriving in 1528, Dorantes was the first African to set foot on what is now Texas soil. His image will be 7′ tall and anchor the left wing of the monument.

Texas Slave Experience

This image depicts the slave experience before emancipation; including the arrival of slaves, “Slave Children” of Texas, cotton picking, slave labor in the lumber industry, the docks of Galveston, on farms, and in the construction of the first Texas Capitol building.

Emancipation

This 10′ high element features a 9′ high image of a male and female slave having broken the bonds of slavery; looking forward to a future of freedom and justice. The male figure is holding the Emancipation Proclamation. The central core element is dedicated to the 182,500 slaves that were freed on June 19, 1865. The imagery is of these now ex-slaves emerging from bondage to the Center State of Freedom.

Texas Post-Slave Experience

The post slavery imagery depicts Blacks in a new work environment from “chain gangs” of Black rounded up on petty charges and forced to work on the new State Capitol and other industries, to Buffalo Soldiers who provided security in he West Texas settlements and cowboys on Texas ranches. The post slave imagery also includes a Black musician to illustrate the impact Texas Black folk music had on the development of Black music in America.

Texas Resources

This area recognizes the many contributions of Black Texans that helped maSave & Exitke Texas one of the richest States in the Union with the development of the cotton industry, original dominance of the cattle industry and natural resources like oil. Black Texans helped build these profitable industries into what they are today without the benefit of meaningful participation in the economic benefit of those resources.

Texas Resources

This area recognizes the many contributions of Black Texans that helped make Texas one of the richest States in the Union with the development of the cotton industry, original dominance of the cattle industry and natural resources like oil. Black Texans helped build these profitable industries into what they are today without the benefit of meaningful participation in the economic benefit of those resources.

Hendrick Arnold and Sam McCullough

Arnold was a cohort of Sam Houston. He operated as special agent in the Battle of the Republic and in the Indian wars. McCullough fought and was wounded at the Battle of Goliad. On October 9, 1835 he was one of the first casualties of the Texas Revolution.

Republic of Texas

The Republic of Texas flag representing the creation of the Republic in 1836. The flag of the United States with 28 starts recognizing the entry of Texas to the Union in 1845.

Battle of Goliad

This scene is from the Battle of Goliad where African American Sam MCCullough is shown being shot in the shoulder in the action of battle.

Location of the Memorial



The Texas African American History Memorial Foundation is created to raise funds for the construction and dedication of a monument honoring African American Texans and their contributions to our great state. View the model on display in the Agricultural Museum of the Texas State Capitol,  at 1100 N. Congress Ave., Austin TX 78701.

SiteLock